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Mad Max

The Road Warrior

Written By:George Miller - 1982

  • The Road Warrior  - George Miller cover

    Warner - 1982

  • The Road Warrior  - George Miller cover

    Warner - 2001

  • The Road Warrior  - George Miller cover

    Warner - 1995


Synopsis

Warner - 1982

A lone hero battles for the future of mankind.

In his most popular movie role, Mel Gibson plays Max, who drives the road of outback Australia in a never-ending search for gasoline. Lining up against him are the bizarre warriors of Lord Hummungus, decked out in heavy-metal costumes heralding a new barbarian age. The battle is joined over a fuel-depot encampment—and the results are savage and spectacular.

Blurb

Warner - 1982

In 1978, a young film director released his first commerical feature Mad Max—and the moviegoing world was astounded by an all-out cinema blitz that became an instant cult classic.

Now, director George Miller has gone a dramatic step farther in conception and technique. The result is The Road Warrior, an epic of action and carnage thatcomes at you full speed, sweeping you into a dreamlike landscape where the post-nuclear future meets the mythological past. It's also one of the most mind-blowing stunt films ever to hit the screen.

Miller, who co-directed the equally spellbinding successor Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, credits as source material everything from Arthurian legends to comic books and samurai movies, wherein the hero, Miller says, "is always a lone, fairly amoral seeker... There's no real hope for him but because of some particular talent he's got—like Max's skill on the highway—he's able to give to a new order."

With The Road Warrior, the new order is born. And it's a blast.

Warner - 2001

"Apocalypse... POW! Exhilarating entertainment." —Richard Corliss, TIME

In action movie annals few can compare with The Road Warrior, a full-throttle epic of speed and carnage rocketing you into a dreamlike landscape where the postnuclear future meets the mythological past. More simply, it's one of the most mind-blowing stunt movies ever made.

Before he took aim in four Lethal Weapons, and his magnificent Braveheart earned him two Academy Awards, Mel Gibson already made his mark on movie history as Max, the heroic loner who drives the roads of the Australian outback searching for gasoline. Arrayed against him and other scraggly defenders of a fuel-depot encampment are the bizarre warriors led by The Humungus, notorious for never taking prisoners when they can pulverize them instead. When the battle is joined, the results are savage, spectacular nad "a smashing good time at the movies" (Sheila Benson, LOS ANGELES TIMES).

Warner - 1995

"Apocalypse... POW! Exhilarating entertainment." —Richard Corliss, TIME

"Breathtaking. An astonishing action masterpiece." —Guy Flatley, COSMOPOLITAN

In the annals of action movies few can compare with The Road Warrior, a full-throttle epic of speed and carnage that rockets you into a dreamlike landscape where the post-nuclear future meets the mythological past. More simply, it's also one of the most mind-blowing stunt movies ever made.

Before he took aim in three Lethal Weapons and starred in 1994's Maverick, Mel Gibson had already made his mark on movie history as Max, the heroic loner who drives the roads of outback Australia in an unending search for gasoline. Arrayed against him and the other scraggly defenders of a fuel-depot encampment are the bizarre warriors commanded by The Humungus, notorious for never taking prisoners when they can pulverize them instead.

When the battle is joined, the results are savage, spectacular and "a smashing good time at the movies" (Shelia Benson, Los Angeles Times). With The Road Warrior on your side, screen action doesn't get any better.

Catastrophe:

Type:

Action
Other Titles in the Mad Max list

1     Mad Max

2     Road Warrior, The

3     Beyond Thunderdome